Sassisailor’s Weblog

A description of my journey to improve my eyesight naturally

January 29, 2008 January 30, 2008

Filed under: My Daily Progress — sassisailor @ 9:39 am

I forgot to put in my post for Monday the 28th that I did 25 minutes on the treadmill and 5 Sun Salutations A.

I completed 2 right arm warming A.T. sessions today.  I did a prolonged relaxation after the sessions and began to feel like I do after I’ve been meditating for at least 15 minutes- it’s a strange state where I feel very connected to my body and I lose a sense of where my limbs are.  My eyes were once again very relaxed after these sessions.  I then did the swaying/swinging from morning routine.  I am thinking of using my spring break time to spend the whole week doing these relaxation techniques (the A.T., palming, eyebag over my eyes, swinging, and test card reading) to try and see what this does to my vision if I concentrate my relaxation and do it for hours every day.

The natural vision teacher I contacted gave me an inspirational article from one of the better eyesight magazines (BEM). This guy spent two weeks with the Bates’, six hours per day and saw significant improvement in this time.  This is the link for the article:

http://www.central-fixation.com/bem/bettereyesight_1920_03.htm#progressive

I can see the value in this because currently my eyes are experiencing bits of relaxation intermixed with strain.  I must wear my reduced glasses at work otherwise I wouldn’t get anything done.  I can leave them off for reading, but at the very least I am wearing negative lenses anywhere from six-ten hours per day… which is unacceptable in my mind for seeing lasting progress in my vision.  Today I was better about not staring at my computer screen but I’m still not swinging consistently.  I use swing windows (see the central-fixation website) to swing the screens that I can, but I’m currently using a program that is not compatible with swing windows, so the window I work in the most remains stationary.   I’m setting up my calendar to remind me every 20  minutes to take a break, look around get up and stretch so I think this will help.

I think I’m going to order a pair of -6 D OD glasses.  My -7 D are too strong but my -5reduced are slightly weak when I have my computer monitor pushed way back.  I still haven’t made a decision about the trial lens kit vs. the focometer.  I’m leaning toward the trial lens kit however.

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6 Responses to “January 29, 2008”

  1. vidi Says:

    I read through the central-fixation article – very inspirational! The universal swing is one thing I have not tried but am considering doing. There are about 25 references to the universal swing in the index of BEM. The description on p. 395 gives a great summary of the universal swing, but still cannot substitute for reading the other references which go more in-depth:

    “When the eyes are at rest, they are always moving. When the body is at rest, it can always be imagined, one part in turn, to be moving or swinging. The chair on which the patient is sitting is swinging. The floor on which the chair rests is also swinging. The walls of the room also swing when the floor swings. When one part of the building swings, one can imagine the whole building to be swinging. The ground on which the building stands is also swinging. When the ground swings, other buildings connected with it swing. One can imagine the whole city to be swinging, this continent and all other continents on the earth can be imagined swinging. In short, one can imagine not only that the whole world is moving, but also the universe, including the sun, the moon and stars. The practice of the universal swing is of the greatest benefit, for in this way one can obtain the maximum relaxation.” (p. 395 – BEM)

    Out of curiosity, I looked up Sun Salutations A. I found this video:
    http://fitsugar.com/234339

    The combination of the “Four-Limbed Staff” and “Downward Facing Dog” in that video is known as Rite Number Five in the Five Tibetan Rites, which I tried previously. Sun Salutations A looks both energizing and relaxing.

  2. sassisailor Says:

    Thanks for the reference to the universal swing page. I’ve been meaning to try it too. There are so many types of swings that I haven’t tried! I’ll check it out after Friday.

    I’m starting to feel and see the swinging motion when I close my eyes and visualize objects. It’s especially strong after I’ve been swaying while doing the dishes or something. I’ve found that doing small swayings when I’m doing mundane things is more relaxing for me then when I just sway to sway. It’s strange…

    I watched the Sun Salutations video. That’s exactly what I do! What an interesting website- I didn’t know they had such videos on the net. I also wasn’t aware of the Five Tibetan Rites. I’ve done a lot of reading into Tibetan Buddhism but that’s about all I know about TIbetan culture. I looked up these rites and they look interesting. The Sun Salutations are very energizing and relaxing once you get the breath synchronized with the postures. It also increases the heart rate significantly. There are Sun Salutations B as well that have a few additional postures. These lead into other series where the SS A and B are the warmup. I’ve been out of regular practice of Astanga Yoga long enough that I decided to start at the beginning again and work my way up slowly.

  3. sassisailor Says:

    Vidi, forgot to ask – how is your vision progress coming?

  4. sorrisi Says:

    hi sister – what an inspirational post! There are so many gems in Bates’s magazines. It’s difficult to take it all in at once! Now that I seem to have the swing during the whole day, I’m going to read a lot on imagination and memory. I read Chapter 14 of perfect sight without glasses yesterday (on imagination) and was very inspired to read up more and try his technique described in this chapter. I’ll write a post about how I get on later!

    love you!

  5. vidi Says:

    Dear Sassisailor,

    You’re welcome! There are many instructional videos covering a wide range of subjects at Youtube.com and Metacafe.com, among other websites. They can be very useful.

    I agree – so many types of swings. Someone else mentioned that the Chinese already developed 64 different types of swings throughout various schools, one of them being the basic form of the swing presented by Dr. Bates. That person mentioned that palming and swinging are Tai Chi Chuan (or Tai Chi) originals – and that palming had been practiced by the Chinese for some 1,500 years before Bates. It is very interesting. Could it have been that Bates came up with ideas from observing such practices somewhere, or he coincidentally developed palming and swinging on his own?

    I am certain, though, that he developed some very original techniques on his own – for example, the black period. He discovered this by accident from looking at a picture of the Rock of Gibralter hanging on a wall at a time when he had presbyopia. This was before he started developing the method. He regarded the black spots on its face and imagined “these spots were the openings of caves, and that there were people in these caves moving about. When I did this my eyes were focussed for the reading distance.” (p. 217 – PSWG)

    It was then he realized the extraordinary usefulness of the imagination. He even wrote, “Of all the discoveries that I have made, there is none of so much practical value as the discovery of the importance of the imagination.” (p. 407 – BEM)

    Thank you for sharing your swinging observations. I’m very glad that we’re able to exchange knowledge in a friendly way. Your insights are invaluable.

    Right now, I am getting the FAFSA, college applications, scholarship applications, evaluations, interviews, and other things out of the way before it gets warm and nice outside. I am plotting a rendezvous course.

    I am maintaining my vision at no worse than 10/12.5 (even in dim light) over several weeks’ time without really doing that much other than good vision habits. I still get chains of impressive clear flashes.

    Yesterday, while doing my routine daily walking, I had multiple chains of clear flashes in which I could see objects very clearly at three miles away. Some chains lasted for 5-6 blinks.

    I can still read up to the 10/6.5 line (my Snellen card is a little different) with a clear flash at any time of the day.

    I have a much better starting place now than before. When I start again, I cannot even say what the results will be. Maybe permanent telescopic vision will result. That would be nice, to be able to see things as well as the current Western Australian Aboriginals can, as well as the ancient Egyptians and Greeks and Romans and Moaris. Those ancient people were able to see with the naked eye even the shape of very faint objects in the night sky like the Ring Nebula, which is oval-shaped instead of circular-shaped.

    One such case can be illustrated by the consellation Neilloan, representing the malleefowl in Aboriginal Astronomy. This southern hemisphere consellation coincided with the bird’s nesting season and it had an unlaid egg in it. The egg was the Ring Nebula. It is very possible that the Boorong (Aboriginal tribe which existed as recently as 150 years ago) also knew it had an oval shape.

    Furthermore, there is solid evidence that the ancient people knew about Saturn’s rings. The Zend-Avesta even mentions the double band and the triple band (harder to see than the double band). The double band itself requires a better telescope than that used during Galileo’s time. Ancient tribes like the ancient Maoris of New Zealand (very unlikely to possess such sophisticated tools) knew about Saturn’s rings. This is shown by their Saturnian ring legend. The question, however, remains of how they knew.

  6. vidi Says:

    Dear Sassisailor,

    You’re welcome! There are many instructional videos covering a wide range of subjects at Youtube.com and Metacafe.com, among other websites. They can be very useful.

    I agree – so many types of swings. Someone else mentioned that the Chinese already developed 64 different types of swings throughout various schools, one of them being the basic form of the swing presented by Dr. Bates. That person mentioned that palming and swinging are Tai Chi Chuan (or Tai Chi) originals – and that palming had been practiced by the Chinese for some 1,500 years before Bates. It is very interesting. Could it have been that Bates came up with ideas from observing such practices somewhere, or he coincidentally developed palming and swinging on his own?

    I am certain, though, that he developed some very original techniques on his own – for example, the black period. He discovered this by accident from looking at a picture of the Rock of Gibralter hanging on a wall at a time when he had presbyopia. This was before he started developing the method. He regarded the black spots on its face and imagined “these spots were the openings of caves, and that there were people in these caves moving about. When I did this my eyes were focussed for the reading distance.” (p. 217 – PSWG)

    It was then he realized the extraordinary usefulness of the imagination. He even wrote, “Of all the discoveries that I have made, there is none of so much practical value as the discovery of the importance of the imagination.” (p. 407 – BEM)

    Thank you for sharing your swinging observations. I’m very glad that we’re able to exchange knowledge in a friendly way. Your insights are invaluable.

    Right now, I am getting the FAFSA, college applications, scholarship applications, evaluations, interviews, and other things out of the way before it gets warm and nice outside. I am plotting a rendezvous course.

    I am maintaining my vision at no worse than 10/12.5 (even in dim light) over several weeks’ time without really doing that much other than good vision habits. I still get chains of impressive clear flashes.

    Yesterday, while doing my routine daily walking, I had multiple chains of clear flashes in which I could see objects very clearly at three miles away. Some chains lasted for 5-6 blinks.

    I can still read up to the 10/6.5 line (my Snellen card is a little different) with a clear flash at any time of the day.

    I have a much better starting place now than before. When I start again, I cannot even say what the results will be. Maybe permanent telescopic vision will result. That would be nice, to be able to see things as well as the current Western Australian Aboriginals can, as well as the ancient Egyptians and Greeks and Romans and Maoris. It is possible that the ancient people could see with the naked eye even the shape of very faint objects in the night sky like the Ring Nebula, which is oval-shaped instead of circular-shaped.

    The consellation Neilloan represents the malleefowl in Aboriginal Astronomy. This southern hemisphere consellation coincided with the bird’s nesting season and it had an unlaid egg in it. The egg was the Ring Nebula. It is possible that the Boorong (Aboriginal tribe which existed as recently as 150 years ago) also knew it had an oval shape.

    Furthermore, there is solid evidence that the ancient people knew about Saturn’s rings. The Zend-Avesta even mentions the double band and the triple band (harder to see than the double band). The double band itself requires a better telescope than that used during Galileo’s time. Ancient tribes like the ancient Maoris of New Zealand (very unlikely to possess such sophisticated tools) knew about Saturn’s rings. This is shown by their Saturnian ring legend. The question, however, remains of how they knew.


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